quiche lorraine

A Quiche Lorraine Recipe From Betty's Cook Nook
Quiche Masterpiece

I love when I get a little history lesson along with a recipe. It’s like two treats in one! Found along with this recipe my Mom clipped from The San Antonio Express-News in 1970 the article tells an interesting story about this recipe’s creator, Ester MacMillan.

Ester helped introduce quiche to foodies near and far after it arrived at the 1968 World’s Fair dubbed “HemisFair” that was held in San Antonio. What a sight that must have been when the Tower of the Americas – an observation tower more than 600 feet tall complete with a spinning 360° top – debuted at the expo! You can read more about Ester and her story about the origin of quiche via the original recipe scan I scored from my Mom’s cookbook below. A postcard from HemisFair 1968, San Antonio, Texas

As a child I remember my Mom, “Betty,” talking about Quiche Lorraine and a few decades later (ahem, just a few) this was the first time I made it. I absolutely loved it! I found the recipe extremely forgiving, meaning you can adapt it to your liking by adjusting the ingredients you introduce into the custard.

Perfect for a brunch-time gathering or  a couch-side treat this recipe scored a well-deserved spot in “The Best Of The Best Recipes” category (at right) … as well as my heart.

I’ve discovered more than one quiche recipe in Mom’s cookbook so I’ll be trying other versions soon and will share them here at Betty’s Cook Nook.

foodie tips

  “Blind baking.” I had never heard of it before until my friend and colleague Suzanne told me about it when I commented that I longed for a crispier quiche crust. Essentially all you do is pre-bake the crust a few minutes before filling it; doing so will help give it more “fluff.” I’ll give blind baking a try on the next making of this dish. And there will be a next time.

  I may have “accidentally” used a teeny bit more meat than the recipe suggests. In fact, Ester called for bacon or ham. A lover of both, I used bacon and ham. #Carnivore. This recipe presumes you will follow suit and use both. I scored some peppered ham at my local HEB and I loved the extra peppery kick.

  After reading the recipe below if you want to learn more about NIOSA and score some of the festival’s recipes, click this link and enjoy!

Quiche Lorraine Ingredients

i. ingredients

9 inch | pie crust
¼ pound | bacon or ham (or both)
1 ½ cup | gruyere or aged cheddar, grated (I used gruyere)
| cage free eggs
1 cup | cream, half and half or undiluted evaporated milk
½ teaspoon | salt
dash | white pepper
dash | nutmeg, grated
1 teaspoon | dried onion
dash | cayenne pepper

ii. what to do

0. Preheat your oven to 400°F. That was easy, right?

1. Line a 9-inch pie pan or fluted quiche pan with pie crust. If you choose, blind bake the doughy crust (per above) and set aside.

2. Cook until crisp the bacon – and or – lightly brown the ham. Set the dynamic duo aside to cool off a bit.A Quiche Lorraine Recipe From Betty's Cook Nook

3. Place your grated cheese (yum, cheese!) in the bottom of your pastry-lined pie pan. Over that, sprinkle your meats.

4. In a medium-sized bowl beat the eggs. Add the cream and the four seasonings and beat a little longer until everything is well-mingled. Pour this egg mixture over the cheese-meat medley.A Quiche Lorraine Recipe From Betty's Cook Nook

5. Bake for about 30 minutes or until crust is golden and custard is set. Remove from oven and cool a bit to lukewarm and serve.

Yield: About 8 servings. Enjoy!

~ Patrick

Betty’s Son
Founder and “Nostalgic Food Blogger” of Betty’s Cook Nook

 

A Quiche Lorraine Recipe From Betty's Cook Nook

A Quiche Lorraine Recipe From Betty's Cook Nook

A scan of Mom’s recipe for Quiche Lorraine. Click to read the interesting story!

Watch this interesting video series about HemisFair 1968! I learned much about my hometown city!


tomato bisque

A Tomato Bisque Recipe From Betty's Cook NookA Christmas Spectacular
(Part I)

Our home at 2927 Trailend was decked out in the holiday best every year.

Our family’s signature was a white-light-wrapped Texas mesquite tree in the front yard. Neighbors expected us to don the tree with the shiny lights and so we did. Hundreds of them. Indoors … garland, ribbons and a crackling fire helped trim the season in the best of ways.

Over 40 Christmases later I stumbled upon a recipe folded and tucked deep inside Mom’s cookbook from an old Southern Living Magazine article headlined “Serve Supper After the Trimming,” which made me snicker. Supper? Um, DINNER! I offer my headline option: “Dinner, Decorate and Discotheque!” ;)

I later realized I had unintentionally ignored this hidden recipe for too many months, but this year it piqued my interest when I actually read past the vintage photo on the time-worn page – it contained two different menu ideas that were “quick to prepare and simple to serve.”

In a new era of microwavable meals and drive-thru food on the go, I don’t know if this would still be considered “quick,” but Joe and I found the holiday flight of recipes surprisingly tasty and worthy of a repeat eat. My chosen line-up? This Tomato Bisque recipe followed by Stroganoff Steak Sandwiches, Holiday Cake and Apple Cider – all coming this holiday season here at Betty’s Cook Nook.

However you celebrate the holidays, the deliciousness of food will make it all the greater!

tasting notes ~

  If you have old recipes like this one, make sure to take note of the details. A simple search of the photographer’s name “Jerome Drown” landed me to this online article with an interesting story of who he was; a Southern Living photographer, nature lover and conservationist with an awesome mid century modern home in Atlanta.

  If you’ve read the original recipe (below) you’ll see we’ve been “gypped” of the Apple Cider recipe. Apparently I could have made a few bucks as a proofreader in a former life. No worries – I’ll find a suitable replacement for the Apple Cider. In the meantime …

i. ingredients

2 (10 ¾ ounce) cans | chicken broth
1 ⅓ cups | canned tomatoes
1 cup | celery, chopped
2 teaspoons | onion, chopped
1 cup | carrots, chopped
1 teaspoon | salt, divided into halves
6 tablespoons | falfurrias brand butter, divided
¼ cup | all-purpose flour
2 ⅔ cups | half-and-half, scalded
2 large | tomatoes, peeled and chopped
2 tablespoons | sugar
¼ teaspoon | soda
to taste | paprika

ii. what to do

1. Combine broth, canned tomatoes, celery, onion , carrots and ½ teaspoon salt in a saucepan. Heat to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. Strain and reserve the broth and discard the veggies (sorry, veggies – you served us well)!

2. Melt 3 tablespoons of the butter in a saucepan then gradually stir in flour. Cook, stirring constantly over low heat for 2 minutes. Gradually add the half-and-half, stirring constantly. Cook, stirring and stirring until thickened. Remove the mixture from heat then stir in the reserved broth from Step 1 (above). Set aside and keep warm.

How To Make Tomato Bisque Soup3. Melt the remaining 3 tablespoons of butter in a skillet. Add the fresh tomato and sauté 2-4 minutes. Stir in the sugar, the remaining ½ teaspoon salt and soda. Add to the broth mixture, stirring well. Garnish with paprika and serve!

Yield: About 6-8 servings

Here’s a scan of the original recipe!

Southern Living Magazine December 1978

 


baked swiss cauliflower

A Baked Swiss Cauliflower Recipe From Bettys Cook Nook
Move Over, Green Bean Casserole…

…there’s a hot, new dish in town and it’s this Baked Swiss Cauliflower recipe!

Before reading the ingredients for this dish I had serious self doubt about how many spoonfuls of this stuff would make it past my proverbial piehole. One plate later and I was ready for a refill.

And  s t r e t c h  pants!

Beth Calkins of Nashville, Tennessee – I don’t know anything about your life outside this recipe but it must have been a kinder, gentler place where sweet, sweet swiss cauliflower rained from the heavens!

Lucky for me my Mom could read between the lines; she knew that anything with cheese and butter becomes a fast, fond feeding moment destined to be recreated.

Ding! Ding! Ding! This just in – come Thanksgiving 2014 this Baked Swiss Cauliflower recipe has secured a guaranteed place at our Thanksgiving table.

Foodie Tips ~

  New to Betty’s Cook Nook? “Butter” is shorthand for “Falfurrias Brand Butter.” It’s what my Grandmother “Nanny” loved near and dear, so it’s naturally the only butter allowed past the threshold.

  Don’t discard the 3 egg whites (below)! I made an egg white omelette the morning after I made this dish and I became a better person because of it. Whoops. Did I say better? I meant butterand cheese! They both made my egg white omelette their new BFF, along with some chopped green onions. Just sayin’.

i. ingredients

| large head of cauliflower
½ cup | bread crumbs
2 ¾ cups | swiss cheese, shredded
1 ½ cups | half and half
| egg yolks, beaten
¼ teaspoon | ground nutmeg
½ teaspoon | salt
¼ teaspoon | fresh cracked pepper
¼ cup | melted falfurrias brand butter

Baked Swiss Cauliflower Flowerets

ii. what to do

0. Preheat oven to 350°F.

1. Wash the cauliflower and discard the green leaves. Break cauliflower into flowerets and place in a medium-sized pot.

2. Cook, covered, 10 minutes in a small amount of boiling salted water. Drain.

Baked Swiss Cauliflower Cheese

3. Place the cooked cauliflower in a buttered 1 ½-quart shallow baking dish. Combine the remaining ingredients – except the butter – and pour over the cauliflower. Drizzle the melter butter over top.

4. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until the top is golden brown.

Yields about 6 servings.

Here’s a scan of Mom’s original recipe!

A Baked Swiss Cauliflower Recipe