dilly-brussels sprouts

Dilly Brussels Sprouts Recipe

This recipe is another great example reminding me “you learn something new every day.”

I always thought it was pronounced “brussel sprouts” until today … when I was researching things and learned it’s actually “Brussels sprouts,” named after the capital city in Belgium.

My Mom “Betty” would surely know how to write the name correctly — it should begin with a CapitalB” and be plural, unless you’re referring to one mini tiny cabbage that you’re eating from a stalk o’ plenty (i.e. “Brussels sprout”). I’m not surprised people drop the “s” at the end of Brussels because ending one word with an “s” and starting the next one with an “s” requires your tongue to perform a linguistic double axle.

Regardless, from here on out it’s Brussels sprouts!

go silly for dilly

Dill weed makes an important appearance in this recipe and hopefully you’ll love the taste as much as I did.

Corn aside, eating my veggies when I was a kid was as exciting as a trip to the dentist or completing a 100-question test. So while calling this “Dilly-Brussels Sprouts” may have been culinary camouflage to entice kids to eat what’s been voted America’s most hated vegetable, the mere mention of the word “dilly” makes me smile and have a try at this dish.

While engaged with some “dilly” research I ran across this touching video of how one family’s lives were changed by another dilly of sorts — the DQ Dilly Bar. This sweet treat reminds me of the special place in my heart for Dairy Queen and their frozen ice cream treasures like sundaes, banana splits, chocolate-dipped cones, blizzards and of course the much beloved Dilly Bar. You can watch some vintage Dairy Queen commercials I curated below.

Several of the recipes I’ve shared on this blog take me back to my childhood home. From dishes that rekindle fond memories shared across the dinner table to long-forgotten tastes that ignite the heart and the belly. Never underestimate the power of cooking, sharing, and bonding over homemade food!

What favorite foods take you home?

foodie tips

  Don’t have Italian dressing on hand? You can whip up your own homemade dressing with this Italian dressing recipe, also here on Betty’s Cook Nook.

  Bring your Brussels frozen or fresh – we don’t judge.

  I like my sprouts best salted and garlic-roasted from the oven but ignore this and try this recipe at least once, as originally penned.

  Hungry for more facts about Brussels sprouts? Read this post, which I found quite interesting!

i. ingredients

10 ounce package | Brussels sprouts, frozen
½ cup | Italian dressing
½ teaspoon | dill weed
1 tablespoon | green onion, sliced

ii. what to do

1. Cook the Brussels and drain.

2. In a small bowl mix together the Italian dressing, dill weed, and green onion. Pour over the sprouts and chill several hours. Stir every now and again to keep things well marinated.

This pairs well with most meat dishes and it can be served as an appetizer before the main spread.

~ Patrick

Betty’s Son
Founder and “Nostalgic Food Blogger” of Betty’s Cook Nook

Dilly Brussels Recipe From Betty's Cook Nook

A Scan Of Mom’s Cookbook Recipe

artichoke ham bites

artichoke ham bites recipe from betty's cook nookI Am Ham, I Am

I’m not sure when I first ate ham.

It was likely during a 1970s Thanksgiving, where Mom would have ensured that the savory sliced delight made its consistent – but special – cameo appearance.

But I do remember the first time I read about ham; who hasn’t likely read one of the Top 5 best-selling books of all time – the book by Dr. Seuss Green Eggs and Ham? Of course nowadays we’re more likely to YouTube it, so let’s have a look:

I was surprised to learn that the hammy book, originally published in 1960, consisted of only 50 different words. And yet this recipe only has 3 ingredients and 4 easy steps. Let’s get started!

foodie tips ~

  Arriving to the store I wasn’t sure what size artichokes to get so I went with the “small” ones and still cut them in half.

  I generously poured the dressing on top of the artichoke hearts and let them marinate overnight in the fridge.

  I baked these 3-4 minutes longer to warm them up good; don’t over bake or else the ham will get dry.

i. ingredients

1 can | artichoke hearts
½ cup or more | garlic italian dressing
6-ounce package | smoked sliced ham
to assemble | toothpicks (or your favorite spear-like pic)

artichoke ham bites - a recipe from betty's cook nook
ii. what to do

1. Drain the artichoke hearts and cut them in half.

2. Place the halved hearts in a medium-sized bowl and add the dressing; stir gently to coat. Place in your fridge for several hours – or overnight – and stir here and there to encourage a bold marination.

3. When done marinating, drain the dressing. Cut the sliced ham into 1½ inch wide strips. Wrap the ham around the artichoke heart and place the flat (cut) side down on a foil-lined baking sheet.

4. Bake at 300°F for 10-14 minutes until hot. Serve warm.

Yields about 12-15 bite-sized appetizers; double for party fare

~ Patrick

Betty’s Son
Founder and “Nostalgic Food Blogger” of Betty’s Cook Nook

artichoke ham bites recipe

Here’s a scan of Mom’s original recipe.

BONUS: Look at all the extra recipes that are on this page from her cookbook – Dig in!